Wine Tips

Making Wines Easy

Lets take it one step at a time

When I tell people about my day job, the first response I get is usually ‘Oh, that’s interesting. Must have plenty of perks.’ Not gonna lie, the perks are pretty good!

The follow up response usually would be : “Oh … could you recommend some good wines?” (if you’re getting a gift for someone – we’ll discuss that in the next posting).

Here’s the thing – I believe that the best person to answer that question should be YOU.

Why is that so? Because wines are like people. They are all unique and will mean different thing to different people and even at different times. For example, siblings from the same family does not necessarily mean that they’ll have identical characters.

Which brings us to the next point : Wines should be for everyone – easily accessible and generously shared. All that is needed is that first step into the discovery of your very own taste.

So … what is it that you enjoy?

Sweet or semi sweet or acidic? Full bodied or medium or light bodied (is this a wrestling guide or something) ? Oak or unoaked, fruity or spicy, and oh also … what do we pair these with? And don’t get me started on the language that is used around these parts : the nose, bouquet, legs – what’s all these? Are we still discussing wines or what?

Lets slow down – we’re here to take things one step at a time. First off, lets start with an introductory bottle of Red and one of White.

Here are two bottles that you could give a go for starters.

The Castillo de Tiebas Tempranillo

For its price point, its a surprising find. Open it up, allow around 20 minutes for it to breathe, and then have a taste. Write down your thoughts on this bottle to compare with other Tempranillos on your journey.

The Fuego Verdejo

This too is one of the bottles that caught our regulars’ attention. Light and easy, with accompanying fruity flavours.

For those who want to venture out a bit of their beginner zone, you could try this :

Ochagavia Don Silvestre Merlot

This is one of our popular wines of Chile and in fact from one of the oldest wine makers there.

A bit more medium bodied with dark fruits and berries being dominant in the taste. And pretty easy to pair with food as well.

Zonin Ventiterre Pinot Grigio

When mentioning about Italian white wines, the name Pinot Grigio often comes to mind.

Fans of Pinot Grigio can expect a light-bodied, delicate white that can go well either with light dishes like appetisers or fish, or on its own.

Try these wines out, and you could start having a note book dedicated to your wine tasting. List down what is it that you like about it. Too sweet for your liking, or just right? Did you like it a bit later after letting it breathe a little (opening the bottle and let it be exposed to the air)? What food did you try the wines with, and what you wished was different with your bottle – these are the notes that you could jot down so that you may recount the experience and plan for your next wine adventure.

Should you have further questions, please write me directly at admin [at] winetalk.com.my and I’ll be happy to tend to your queries.

Cheers!